What fruit should I eat on a yeast free diet?

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Fruit needs to be considered when you're doing a yeast-free diet as we're meant to be avoiding sugar and sugary foods. I've covered this a little in my post about sugar here but I thought I'd write a bit more about fruits which have low sugar.

Simple! Yes? Just google a few websites, write down a list of how few grams of sugar each fruit contains and you're done, right?! Well that's what I thought when I started this post. But the more research I did the more I found conflicting numbers, particularly about high sugar fruit. 

If I had all the time in the world I am sure I could write a much longer and more well-researched post about these differences (geek creeping in there!), but I wanted to keep this simple and focus on the low sugar fruits anyway. 

Also I don't want to demonize any particular type of food. As well as sugar, fruit obviously contains loads of other brilliant and essential stuff your body wants and needs. I would never advocate cutting it out totally and I know for those with a sweeter tooth it's pretty essential to replace the sugar you're cutting out elsewhere on yeast-free. 

However it's always good to be aware of high and low sugar fruits, to make better informed choices when faced with a selection. 

The list here is fresh fruit. Dried fruit, as I discuss on the sugar blog post, is really high in sugar and I am choosing to avoid in my recipes on The Flourishing Pantry.

What do you think of this list? What do you eat carefree and try to limit a little?  Have you found conflicting information about what's high and what's low? And does it matter if you have everything in moderation anyway?! 

1. OLIVES
 0 grams of sugar per 100g

Yes a fruit, apparently! Just be careful not to get ones that have been in vinegar to preserve them. Some yeast-free lists say not to eat green olives for this reason. The Milkwood Blog suggests it's perfectly possible to preserve olives without vinegar, so they can be found.  

2. AVOCADO
1 gram of sugar per 100g 

3. RHUBARB
1 gram of sugar per 100g

4. CRANBERRIES
4 grams of sugar per 100g

5. RASPBERRIES
5 grams of sugar per 100g

6. BLACKBERRIES
7 grams of sugar per 100g

7. STRAWBERRIES
7 grams of sugar per 100g

8. GRAPEFRUIT
7 grams of sugar per 100g

I have to say grapefruit is not my favourite fruit in the world, but if you've got a recipe suggestion perhaps I should give it another go! 

9. PEACHES
8 grams of sugar per 100g

I have become a bit obsessed with peaches since having the most delicious salad made with two types of tomato and slices of peaches, all tossed with feta cheese... Must make! 

10. KIWIS
9 grams of sugar per 100g

Some websites list kiwis as 7g but that's per kiwi, not per 100g. I tried to present everything here as like-for-like. 

 

If you compare these with grapes (16-18g), figs (16g), lychees (15g), banana (15g), mangoes (14g) and dried dates (64g, just so you can see the impact with dried fruit!), our list contains half the sugar of these if not less. So definitely the go-to list when whipping up a smoothie or fruity dessert. What's your favourite? 

Here are some of the places I looked for info:
http://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/high-low-sugar-fruits
http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/the-6-best-low-sugar-fruits
http://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/food/8-low-sugar-fruits
http://thepaleodiet.com/fruits-and-sugars/ 
http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/health-benefits-figs
http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/dried-figs-healthy-fresh-7408.html
http://google.com and then searching "sugar in XXX", which uses the USDA database:
https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/search/